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of journalist cokie roberts. yesterday members of the house gave tributes to the louisiana democrat. lindy boggs was 97. >> speaker, i rise today to pay tribute to a former member of the house and a grand lady from louisiana, ms. lindy boggs. she was a pioneer for the state of louisiana, and she served louisiana's second congressional district following death of her late husband who was then the majority leader of the house. she was the first woman elected to represent the state of louisiana in congress, and she was a founder of the congresswomen's caucus, and in tribute to her service as a pioneer for women, the women -- congressional women's reading room is rightfully named in her honor down the hall. lindy was the first woman and only louisiana ambassador to the holy sea during the tenure of pope john paul ii. lindy effortlessly balanced her role as a respected leader and a loving mother. she loved her city of new orleans, in fact, lived on bourbon street for many of her later years in new orleans. she loved her beloved tulane university and, in fact, just recently she and her daughter partic
preparedness for the louisiana department of health and hospitals. that puts her smack in the middle of coordinating federal, state and local age is -- agencies and preparing for disasters of various types. she has a rich and varied background in health administration roles. she was around during the katrina days in louisiana and shy has been with the department more than 20 years. we're really pleased to have you with us today. >> make sure i've got this right. >> wait. more time. there you go. >> can you hear me? all right. well, good afternoon. i think i was one of the last panelists to be picked up on this very distinguished panel. so i thought, i would talk to you from what i know in terms of my strength is more in operations. usually i'm never at a loss for words. from an operations perspective. if you told me that, you told me the problem is katrina, dpus starve, rita, ike, the mississippi oil spill. recently tropical storm isaac last year. so some of the operation concerns that we have. if you said how will which evacuate half of our coastline in a 38-hour period i know who t
'll catch those people who are here and violating the law -- >> host: our next call is mike from louisiana. independent line. good morning. >> caller: good morning. >> host: good morning, mike. >> caller: yeah. some of the points he makes, i need to get this man to go out and ask women to go out with me the way he seems to go any real problem you have so you can figure them out later. >> host: put that in the form of a question, we'll get a response. >> caller: okay. we'll start with a little bit of time that he's put on. he said that being -- there was no problem with having your own culture. that's all fine. i -- i'm from louisiana i'm supposed to be french-english but i don't wear a beret. the irish people only celebrate one day a year. they don't speak guy -- i have three or four more points. basically his points. >> host: thank you, mike. >> guest: first of all, there's nothing in our law that requires spanish or any other language to be spoken. you know, i watch spanningish--- spanish-language television 10% of the time. 90% of the time i'm watching english-language television or eng
served in the u.s. army from 1989 to 1994 and was stationed in germany and fort polk, louisiana. dustin, the youngest of three sons, knew from an early age he wanted a military career. he'd been wanting to do that since he was a little boy about when he was 6 years old, darrell recalls. i encouraged him to do so, and he was a leader. he'd take the initiative to get things done. i've always raised my boys to do the right thing no matter if the cause was popular or unpopular. by the time he reached high school dustin was a top cadet in his junior rotc program. i remember him as a model student, very quiet, and serious. you always knew where he stood, says colonel mark jones of the air force junior rotc program at south laurel high school, dustin's alma mater. dustin rose to be his junior rotc unit's corps commander and the most decorated cadet.f pfc s shoong many -- shook many at south laurel high where dustin graduated in 2010 and had many friends. when i heard he died my legs almost collapsed. it was unbelievable. he was a good friend, a mentor and a truly good person says deafen burkha
energy. >> guest: louisiana i had a great trip there in a bipartisan delegation. there is such potential to open up and create jobs. when i talk about revenue generation. it's actually taking the amazing resources of natural gas and oil and also wind and the renewables and leveraging that inputting americans to work in changing lives and creating a revenue that we need for better roads and better schools. i think in washington we too often polarized either you are for the environment or for jobs or something like this and i just don't see it that way. we can do what has been done in the leasing and other areas, diversify the economy and great paying jobs. >> host: what specifically though are you talking about? >> guest: i ran on this opening up coast of virginia so we can drill and get to the natural resources that are there in an environmentally safe way. the governor ran on it and the general assembly wants it and the president the only thing holding us us back as chile demonstration. that is not a partisan comment but to the secretary of the interior they are not moving forward and e
to as many as six or seven refineries from kansas, oklahoma, texas to louisiana. there is no doubt the vast majority of not 100% of the gasoline will be distributed within the united states and not put on. but there have been -- we do export diesel because we don't use it like europe does so we have had a symbiotic relationship. we send them our diesel and they send us our gasoline. so, that would continue. also some of the manufacturing products that are bipartisan from the oil that we don't use would be exported, too. those are actually healthy for our economy. >> host: in issue that does affect nebraska but you don't necessarily think of it when you talk about immigration. how does it affect nebraska and where are you personally on emigration? >> guest: it does affect nebraska. we have a lot of plants and agriculture but to rely on and we have had a good share of immigrants in both omaha and my district as well as other cities throughout nebraska so we need reform and make them attack that issue. where i am and i think this is the consensus of the republican conference, too. it's hard to
the louisiana purchase which doubled the size of united states of america in 1804. teddy roosevelt was the first american to win the nobel peace brise -- prize because he mediated in 19 50s. that was critical to overcome the act of power. president kennedy turned the diplomacy when the great majority of the advisers in october of 1962, said use force. at the final moment, president kennedy brokered a negotiated comprise with our greatest enemy the soviet. that's how the cuban missile crisis ended. that's how we didn't destroy hundreds and millions of people on the east coast, in europe, and russia. because diplomacy rather than force triumphed. henry kissinger going strong at the age of 90, by the way, forty years ago, negotiated his brilliant opening to china that opened up relations that have been frozen football the last twenty years prior and insure -- ensured a jen generation of peace. think of president bush. a lot of people think he was the most established. he had are vast experience as a diplomat, he had faith in diplomacy, he had achieved the unification of germany in nato after the en
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7